ForumToyota
  1. Startseite
  2. Forum
  3. Auto
  4. Toyota
  5. Toyota schlechter und schlechter

Toyota schlechter und schlechter

Themenstarteram 20. Dezember 2006 um 15:08

Habe einen interessanten Artike in Englischer Sprache gefunden, in dem behauptet wird dass Toyotas auf ihrem wichtigsten Markt den USA gar nicht mehr die Nase dermassen vorne hat. Die Amerikanische Konkurrenz holt allmählich bezüglich Qualität und Spritverbrauch auf.

Hier der Artikel aus dem Wallstreet Journal (in Englischer Sprache):

Ford and General Motors have taken turns besting the Toyota Camry in quality surveys for the past two years, but if you talk to many Americans - especially the ones who would never consider supporting home-based auto companies - you’d never know it.

Last year, the Chevrolet Impala beat the Toyota Camry in initial quality according to J.D. Power & Associates, and Consumer Reports just announced that both the Ford Fusion and Mercury Milan scored higher than both the Toyota Camry and the Honda Accord this year.

After the announcement, Ford’s Director of Global Quality Debbe Yeager commented "It’s a perception gap," referring to the struggle American companies have had overcoming the perceived and seemingly untarnishable reputation of their foreign rivals.

Even as GM and Ford have accumulated award after award on vehicle quality, you’d almost never know about such quality gains made by American companies - or quality declines of foreign companies - by listening to the media. Did you hear about it when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced that Toyota recalled more vehicles than it sold in the U.S. last year? Probably not. Did you hear about Toyota making an "elaborate apology" for their "worrisome series of recalls" that has "tarnished its reputation for quality?" Probably not. Did you hear about the Toyota senior manager quote that stated "We used to do quiet recalls called ‘service campaigns’ to deal with defects but we’re not going to hide anything anymore?" Such a statement suggests Toyota’s past recall numbers were probably much higher than we were led to believe, and they profited handsomely by having a perception of higher quality than they deserved. In Japan, prosecutors are looking into possible negligence on the part of Toyota for shirking recalls for the last eight years. How ironic. You probably didn’t hear about that one either because the American media doesn’t like to bash foreign auto companies - only American ones.

Then there’s the mythical perception that foreign automakers produce the most fuel efficient cars and that Detroit only makes gas-guzzlers when the truth is that all automakers - including Toyota, Honda and Hyundai-Kia alike - have allowed fuel economy to slide in the past 20 years since they all now sell bigger trucks and more SUVs. One of Toyota’s senior executives was even quoted in the Wall St. Journal September 28 saying that both the Toyota Sequoia and Tundra "are big gas-guzzling vehicles" and expressed "concern about the longer-term prospects." These longer-term prospects about their admitted gas-guzzlers are questioned because they know that Ford’s F-150 and Chevy’s Silverado have led the pack in sales year after year.

Yes, gasoline has been getting more expensive - at least until recently - but the fact that Americans continue to buy it in greater quantities qualifies us as hypocrites for suggesting GM and Ford stop building so many big trucks and SUVs. After all, GM and Ford are only responding to demand as any company would and should if they want to remain profitable in a cut-throat competitive market. According to a Business Week survey, we Americans bought 10% more gasoline in the first six months of 2006 compared to the first six months of 2000 even though gas prices rose 75% in that period. Maybe here I could also mention that the Chevy Tahoe beat the gas-guzzling Toyota Sequoia in quality surveys and gets better gas mileage to boot.

But what has happened since gas prices have been on the decline in recent months? The Wall Street Journal reported a "slight" increase in truck sales by American companies, as Ford Expedition sales were up 41% and Lincoln Navigator sales were up 44%. The American media even tries to restrain its applause for home-based auto companies by referring to gains of over 40% as "slight!"

Perhaps the biggest perception problem is that American automobile companies GM and Ford (Chrysler is now German-owned) squander all their money on plants overseas and foreign automakers build their factories in the U.S. Foreign car lovers will surely point to Kia’s plans to build its first-ever U.S. plant in Georgia, but they probably won’t mention that they received $400 million in tax giveaways to do it, which translates into $160,000 per job. Among the many benefits for the foreign-owned company, your tax dollars are going to be used for road improvements surrounding the complex, complete with flower beds and other beautification features. Hey, as long as we’re going to allow states to bid for private jobs with our public tax dollars, we might as well make it look good, right?

And the foreign car lovers will probably also not tell you (or maybe they just don’t know or don’t want you to know) that GM and Ford pour more money into existing American facilities than foreign automakers spend on new plants, usually with little or no tax breaks. GM has already spent over $500 million upgrading two transmission plants this year, and has spent nearly a billion dollars over the last decade, for example, for facility upgrades in Texas. And what do GM and Ford get for making their existing plants more efficient? It isn’t tax breaks. Instead, they get accusations of not being "competitive" enough! Maybe here I should also mention that the average domestic parts content for Kia is 3%, while the average domestic parts content of Ford and GM is 78% and 74% respectively. This means that buying a U.S.-assembled (or even foreign-assembled, for that matter) GM or Ford supports more American jobs than a U.S.-assembled car or truck with a foreign nameplate.

Fortunately for our benefit, the U.S. remains the overall global leader in research and development, and a big reason for that is that American automakers - according to the Level Field Institute - invest $16 billion in R&D (Research & Development) annually, which outpaces any other industry one could name. Admittedly, the Level Field Institute counts German-owned DaimlerChrysler as an American automaker, so Ford and GM’s combined R&D contribution to America is closer to around $12 billion. But who’s counting, right? Certainly not the American auto-bashing media.

Japanese companies do employ 3,600 American workers in R&D, but that still leaves the foreign competition behind in the dust staring at American rear bumpers. 3,600 sounds like a big number until you realize that 65,000 Americans work in R&D facilities in the state of Michigan alone. In fact, two of the top four R&D spending companies in America as reported by the Wall Street Journal are - you guessed it - Ford and General Motors. The other two are also American companies: Pfizer and Microsoft.

Ford has recently made headlines as the American automaker with the most challenges to its future, but these challenges certainly are not because they "aren’t making cars people want to buy." Toyota did outsell Ford in July, but since then, Ford has reclaimed the No. 2 spot and has held it ever since. GM has the highest market share, increasing over 2 percentage points from a year ago. So apparently they can’t be accused of not making cars people want to buy either. Ford sales are also up in Europe, and Ford doubled their sales in China, where GM has the highest market share of any automaker.

General Motors also reported a 3.9% rise in August vehicle sales despite high gas prices and a supposedly slowing economy. And even though Toyota reported record sales that month, they couldn’t match the non-record setting sales volume of Ford. GM’s sales rose 17% in October from the same month in 2005 and Ford sales rose 8% in the same period. Ford also sits on $23 billion in cash, so they have plenty of money to focus on and fix any problems.

And for all the talk about the lack of fuel efficiency of American automakers, it seems three-fourths of all automakers failed to meet Europe’s improved fuel-efficiency standards intended to cut carbon-dioxide emissions. Japanese and German automakers topped the list of the study’s worst performers, but according to an environmental group’s study, GM’s Opel division and Ford both "come out well."

In closing, I’ll leave some encouraging numbers for those of us who actually like to root for and support the home team. The J.D. Power 2006 Vehicle Dependability Survey reports that Mercury, Buick and Cadillac (in that order) grabbed the number 2, 3 and 4 spots to beat Toyota, Honda, Nissan, BMW and everyone else (except Lexus) in having the least number of problems per 100 vehicles.

Perhaps someday the American media will give GM and Ford the credit they deserve. And once they do, perception among the majority of the American public will rightfully change. GM and Ford aren’t only doing what they should to make gains in the American market to deserve American consumer loyalty; they’re also doing what they should to make gains in the markets of China, Europe and across most of the rest of the globe.

Roger Simmermaker is the author of "How Americans Can Buy American: The Power of Consumer Patriotism." He also writes "Buy American Mention of the Week" articles for his website www.howtobuyamerican.com and is a member of the Machinists Union and National Writers Union. Roger has been a frequent guest on the Fox News Channel, CNN and MSNBC and has been quoted in the USA Today, Wall Street Journal and US News & World Report among many other publications.

http://www.howtobuyamerican.com/bamw/bamw-061129-auto.shtml

Ähnliche Themen
126 Antworten

Hmm, hätte da nicht der Link gereicht anstatt hier einen halben Roman zu posten?

http://www.howtobuyamerican.com/ allein sagt doch schon alles ...

Egal wer den Artikel verfasst hat, ist es glaube ich mittlerweile so, dass die US-Auto-Riesen GM und Ford erkannt haben, das es 5 nach 12 ist und jetzt aus ihrem Schlaf erwacht sind und schon mehr drauf achten, was für Produkte sie auf den Martk bringen. Die Zeiten der Spritschluckenden Motoren ist sicherlich auch in den USA vorbei. Chrysler wäre mittlerweile wohl längst am Ende, wenn Mercedes sie nicht übernommen hätten. Und Ford un GM steht nicht viel besser da. Ich wundere mich sowieso, warum die so lange gebraucht haben, um aufzuwachen. In den USA haben sie den Vorteil - im Gegensatz zu uns hier - dass das Auto nicht besonders gut verarbeitet sein muss, darauf achtet der Amerikaner nicht so sehr. Schautr man sich ma den 300C oder diverse Jeeps an, sieht man auf Anhieb, dass da nur sehr wenig zusammenpasst. Ich erinnere an das legendäre Video von Herrn Bernhard (damals CHrysler), wie er mit seinem Geburtstagsgeschenk (einer VideoCam) den neuen Chrysler Pacifica begutachtet und dermaßen ausflippt, dass er sich die Kamera nimmt und jeden einzelnen Verarbeitungsfehler dokumentiert.

Themenstarteram 20. Dezember 2006 um 16:24

Zitat:

Original geschrieben von Tofffl

Egal wer den Artikel verfasst hat, ist es glaube ich mittlerweile so, dass die US-Auto-Riesen GM und Ford erkannt haben, das es 5 nach 12 ist und jetzt aus ihrem Schlaf erwacht sind und schon mehr drauf achten, was für Produkte sie auf den Martk bringen. Die Zeiten der Spritschluckenden Motoren ist sicherlich auch in den USA vorbei. Chrysler wäre mittlerweile wohl längst am Ende, wenn Mercedes sie nicht übernommen hätten. Und Ford un GM steht nicht viel besser da. Ich wundere mich sowieso, warum die so lange gebraucht haben, um aufzuwachen. In den USA haben sie den Vorteil - im Gegensatz zu uns hier - dass das Auto nicht besonders gut verarbeitet sein muss, darauf achtet der Amerikaner nicht so sehr. Schautr man sich ma den 300C oder diverse Jeeps an, sieht man auf Anhieb, dass da nur sehr wenig zusammenpasst. Ich erinnere an das legendäre Video von Herrn Bernhard (damals CHrysler), wie er mit seinem Geburtstagsgeschenk (einer VideoCam) den neuen Chrysler Pacifica begutachtet und dermaßen ausflippt, dass er sich die Kamera nimmt und jeden einzelnen Verarbeitungsfehler dokumentiert.

hast Du vielleicht einen Link zu dem Video?

gruss Mark

nein, leider nicht, bin aber schon lange am suchen. Sollte ich es finden, melde ich mich.

Einige Amis fahren ja auch schon mit Hybriden rum (z.B. Mercury). Der Witz ist, das sie die Technik von Toyota gekauft haben und Toyota die Teile liefert :p Also wird mit jedem Mercury Hybrid gleichzeitig Toyotas Hybrid-Forschung mitfinanziert. Scheiß Globalisierung, oder? :D

Ansonsten ist der Text ziemlich reißerisch geschrieben und wie GS schon sagt: Der Linkname deutet daraufhin wieso ;)

Ebenso wie die ADAC Pannenstatistik ist J.D.Power hier offensichtlich nur so lange anerkannt, wie das Hohelied auf Toyota gesungen wird.

Hat hier doch niemand gesagt, oder? Nur ich kann mir auch die am schlechtesten anschneidenden Fahrzeuge von Audi raussuchen und sowas schreiben. Toyota ist immerhin mit mehreren dutzenden Autos bei J.D.Power vertreten, das dabei nicht alle Auto ganz vorne sind ist nunmal normal.

Aber Ingesamt steht Toyota halt am besten da und soviel Grips sowas selbst zu bedenken, sollte eigentlich jeder parat haben.... Wobei in Sachen Qualität ja Lexus ganz oben stand, Toyota in Sachen Kundenzufriedenheit.

Das auch Ford gute Autos baut, bestreitet sicherlich niemand, aber hier wird halt immer von der Summe der Modelle und dem Gesamtabschneiden ausgegangen. In der Bundesliga gewinnen auch Absteiger mal Spiele, ändert aber nichts daran, das sie am Ende der Saison trotzdem abgestiegen sind ;)

Guten Abend,

Der Artikel sieht mir stark nach einer PR-Aktion aus. Warum? Verschiedene Angaben sind komplett falsch und dass nun auf diese Weise argumentiert wird, erstaunt eigentlich kaum, wenn man weiss in welcher Klemme vorallem GM und Ford stecken.

1.) Sprit sparende US-Entwicklungen

So ist z.B. allgemein bekannt, dass z.B. Ford den Grossteil seiner letzten Jahre und R&D-Ressourcen darauf verwendet hat, an neuen Trucks/Pick-ups rumzubasteln - deren grosse Motoren und entsprechende Spritverbräuche sind bekannt.

2.) Besser werdende Qualität bei GM, Ford und D-Chrysler

Es wurde hier richtig geschrieben, dass der amerikanische Durchschnitts-Käufer generell für "gewöhnliche Fahrzeuge" ein eher tieferes Q-Empfinden hat. Hierdurch ist z.T. auch erklärbar, dass grössere Schlitten aufgrund der Verarbeitung und Ausstattung für viel mehr Leute zugänglich sind. Bei diversen Beschaffungsabklärungen - aus meiner Zeit als F+E-Leiter - erinnere ich mich, dass viele amerikanische Anbieter zu gleichem oder sogar höherem Preis wesentlich geringwertigere Ware anboten (sicht- und testbar): diesbezüglich und auch für die Ausführung von Produkten des täglichen Gebrauchs ist USA manchmal schon fast eine "Insel". Bei meinen letzten Aufenthalten (2004+2005) in USA hatte ich zufälligerweise 2 mal als Mietwagen einen Chevrolet Impala neuester Ausführung. Diese Fahrzeuge sind einfach nur "Kisten" und so funktionnierte z.B. einmal bei leicht feuchter Strasse das ABS nicht. Hält man z.B. in USA hinter einem amerikanischen Fahrzeug, sind grobe Differenzen in den Spaltabständen auf einige Meter mit blossem Auge häufig erkennbar. Sicher, auch der Vergleich der früheren Camry's zwischen japanischer und amerikanischer Ausführung zeigt deutliche Unterschiede - aber nicht in diesem Ausmass wie viele Amerikanische Modelle.

3.) Chrysler

Einige Jahre vor der Übernahme (Fusionen gibt's selten - einer liegt immer oben :-) ) war Chrysler bezüglich seinem Management und einem Aufbruch in die Moderne gegenüber GM und Ford wesentlich besser aufgestellt. Ob der Schulterschluss zu Daimler-Chrysler wirklich etwas gebracht hat, da streitet man sich. Fragt man die Analysten, dann wurde eigentlich eher Firmenwert vernichtet..

Woran krankt also die US-Automobilindustrie?

1.) Massive Überkapazitäten aus "guten" Zeiten, nicht nur wegen falscher Modell-Politik. Des weiteren haben GM und Ford auch massive Defizite im Bereich strategisches Marketing zu verantworten: Ansammlung von Dutzenden von Brands aus früheren Zeiten unter einem Dach. Leider ist es so, dass viele Marken-Modell-Überschneidungen existieren und die einzelnen Brands nicht wirklich positionniert sind und klar für etwas stehen (Ausnahme z.B. Cadillac). Ansonsten ein Sammelsurium an Marken und (Ver)-Marktung nach dem Motto "es findet sich für jeden was..".

 

2.) Hohe Pensionskassenbelastungen, so z.B. pro Fahrzeug von über 1'000 USD. Kein Kommentar..

3.) Moderne Produktions-methoden und Logistik wurden teilweise eingeführt aber nicht zu Ende gedacht. GM hätte aus seiner Kooperation mit der "Nummi-Plant" (GM+TMC) wesentlich mehr von Toyota lernen können, stattdessen bestimmen indirekt noch vielfach die Labour Unions, dass immer noch und häufig auf funktionale Organisationen gesetzt wird. TMC hat sich, nicht nur in Japan, diesbezüglich mit den Gewerkschaften korrekt arrangiert - wie auch schon in Japan Anfangs der 60er Jahre.

Die Lage bei den US-Automobil Herstellern ist wahrscheinlich ernster, als von von den meisten wahrgenommen. Diese versteckte "Buy-American" Aufforderung kommt mir irgendwie bekannt vor..

Gruss,

LexPacis

P.S: Ich hoffe für GM und Ford dass sie die Kurve wieder "kratzen" - ohne solche "PR-Gags"

Hallo LexPacis,

meine Rede. 100% Agree. :)

Diese "Buy-American"-Kampagne keimte zuletzt Anfang/Mitte der 80er auf. Und auch damals waren es die Japaner, die den US-Autobauern hohe Absatzeinbußen einbrachten. Heute mischen jedoch auch die Europäer deutlich stärker mit als damals.

Dazu passt auch der neue Werbespot der 2007er Truck-Generation von GM: erst werden die Verwüstungen von Katrina gezeigt, dann ein paar Soldaten im Irak, der 11. September, ein Kind im Kornfeld oder so und dann der Spruch "Our Country - our Truck". Irgendwie so ging der jedenfalls und ich finde es einfach peinlich.

Bei den Überkapazitäten ist besonders problematisch, dass es keinen temporären Produktionsüberhang, sondern einen strukturellen Überhang gibt.

Das heißt, dass die Automobilindustrie weltweit über Produktionsanlagen verfügt, die einen Ausstoß erzeugen, der weit über der Nachfrage liegt. Jeder Konzern hat so seine eigenen Vorstellungen, was absetzbar ist. Rechnet man diese Planzahlen (die sich ja unterjährig in Produktionszahlen manifestieren) aller Hersteller zusammen, liegt man ca. 4-5 Mio. Einheiten über dem Bedarf des Weltmarkts.

Was das bedeutet, dürfte klar sein: Verdrängungswettbewerb!

Und wer in einem Verdrängungswettbewerb die falschen Produkte an Bord hat, dem geht´s ans Eingemachte.

Ford, GM und Chrysler haben ja ordentlich abgesahnt in den späten 90ern und kurz nach der Jahrtausendwende.

Doch dann lief irgendwie alles anders als geplant und die Big Three waren in keinster Weise darauf vorbereitet.

Hoher Benzinpreis, Klimadiskussion, Hybrid, Comeback der Limousinen und jetzt auch noch massig erfolgreiche Kompaktwagen. Die einst so erfolgreichen SUV´s, Minivans und Trucks stecken in einem Formtief. Der US-Markt hatte sich innerhalb von Monaten um 180 Grad gedreht.

Das Limousinen- und Kompaktwagen-Portfolio der US-Hersteller war überaltert und wenig attraktiv. Hier ging zuvor kaum ein Cent an Entwicklungsgeldern hinein.

Kurzum: Man war auf eine Veränderung des Marktes nicht vorbereitet, und so etwas darf eigentlich nicht sein!

 

Mittlerweile schießen aber attraktive Limousinen, Coupés, Roadster, Kompaktvans und "Klein"wagen wie Pilze aus dem Boden - mit großzügiger Unterstützung der europäischen Ableger Ford EU und Opel/Saab. Die neuen Modelle sind interessant, mal schauen, wie sie der Markt aufnimmt.

Die eigene Hybridtechnologie wird gemeinsam von GM, DC und BMW vorangetrieben. Ford ging das offenbar nicht schnell genug, daher der Aggregate-Zukauf von Toyota.

Die Big Three brauchen ganz schnell Erfolgserlebnisse, um wieder auf die Spur zu kommen.

Die oben aufgeführten Äußerungen von "How-to-buy..." halte ich für einen panikartigen Versuch, den "japanisch/europäischen Stecker aus der Steckdose zu ziehen".

Na wie auch immer, ich kann nur hoffen, dass die sich schnell wieder aufrappeln, denn eigentlich mag ich amerikanische Autos.

Gruß

Flo

Zitat:

Original geschrieben von LexPacis

Die Lage bei den US-Automobil Herstellern ist wahrscheinlich ernster, als von von den meisten wahrgenommen. Diese versteckte "Buy-American" Aufforderung kommt mir irgendwie bekannt vor..

Ist im Prinzip auch nix Neues, taucht in vielen Ländern immer wieder mal auf, z.B. die Kampagne "Buy British", die es vor Jahren mal gab, oder den alten Nazi-Slogan "Deutsche, kauft bei Deutschen".

>In den USA haben sie den Vorteil - im Gegensatz zu uns hier - dass das Auto nicht besonders gut verarbeitet sein muss, darauf achtet der Amerikaner nicht so sehr.

Da habe ich ich aber anderes gehört, sonst hätten jap. Autos dort auch gar nicht den Fuß in die Tür gekriegt, bzw. sogar den Markt erobert.

Ciao Carina,

Du hast nicht unrecht. Meine Aussage mit dem Camry betrifft nicht nur die Verarbeitung/ Toleranzen sondern auch den Umstand, dass ich z.B. die verwendeten Materialen als etwas weniger aufwendig (heisst aber nicht billig!) empfunden habe und vor allem die Basisausführungen aus meiner Sicht sehr spärlich gehalten sind.

Die Camry TV-Werbung in USA (2005) sagte sowas wie ab 17'ooo USD Basispreis für einen Camry (also ungefähr 14'ooo €). Bei uns in der Schweiz lag der Basispreis des letzten Camry's bei ca. 42'ooo CHF (ca. 28'ooo €). Das Ganze wäre um die Ausstattungen zu bereinigen.

Diese "Kurs-Umrechnungen" liefern nur z.T. ein Bild, da die Wertschöpfung des Camry's ja fast vollständig in USA selber geschieht. Abgesehen vom harten Wettbewerb hat der Camry auch den Vorteil, dass er in USA ein "Volumen-Modell" ist (meistverkaufter Pkw in USA).

Das Toyota Production System folgt weltweit den gleichen kontinuierlich weiterverbesserten Standards und wie das Wort kontinuierliche Verbesserung (Kai-zen) ja aussagt, haben die japanischen TMC Werke halt gegenüber amerikanischen und europäischen TMC-Werken einige Jahre Vorsprung - trotz Wissensaustausch. Den Q-Hebel sehe ich bei TMC weniger bei den eigenen Werken, sondern in der Frage wie gut man, ausserhalb von Japan, die Lieferanten dazu kriegt, die eigenen Philosophien rund ums TPS selber zu übernehmen und kontinuerlich zu verbessern.

Wie von Dir richtig dargestellt, verdanken die Japaner einen Grossteil ihres Erfolges in USA ihrer Qualität/ Zuverlässigkeit aber teilweise auch der Tatsache, dass ein Markt für kleinere/ mittelgrosse Fahrzeuge schon vor 25 Jahren vorhanden war und die US-Industrie dies eher ignoriert hat. VW hatte übrigens damals mit seinen kleineren Modellen recht viel Erfolg in USA aber später das Ganze praktisch kampflos an die Japaner "abgegeben".

Ich würde ohne Bedenken einen Camry kaufen, der in USA hergestellt wurde - mal abgesehen von den typisch amerikanischen Blinklichtern, die ich bis heute nicht nachvollziehen kann und einfach nur nerven..

Gruss,

LexPacis

P.S: Ich bin mir da nicht zu 100% sicher, aber es scheint mir einleuchtend, dass bei US-Fahrzeugen die für den US-Markt hergestellt werden eine einfachere Auslegung als in Europa möglich sein sollte. Auch wenn die amerikanischen Tachos 120 MPH und mehr anzeigen, bei Auslegung z.B. eines Top-Speeds von 100 MPH müsste seitens der Komponenten - Fahrwerk, Motor, Abgas-system, Reifen etc. - bereits eine merkliche Kosteneinsparung möglich sein? Zusätzlich wird ein Fahrzeug durch das eher disziplinierte Cruisen bei 60 - 75 MPH auf dem Highway nicht gerade arg beansprucht..

P.S: http://www.toyota.com/vehicles/2007/camry/models.html

Hoi,

bei uns in den Internet Nachrichten auf "Südtirol Online" war heute oder gestern ein Bericht, dass 2007 Toyota als Nr. 1 der Autohersteller aufsteigen wird.

Diese Zahlen werden ja bekanntlich durch den Amerikanischen MArkt und nicht in Europa gemacht.

Glaube daher nicht, dass der Bericht am Anfang des Thead auf reellen Zahlen und Fakten beruht, sondern eine lächerliche Kampagne der amerikanischen Autoindustrie zur Stimmungmachung "erfunden" wurde.

Auch Dumm, da ja bekanntlich Toyota in ganz Amerika (Kontinent) sehr viele Werke betreibt und damit das Verhungern tausender Amerikanischer Familien verhindert. Außerdem produziert Toyota zusätzlich noch in Werken von GM oder Ford mit freien Kapazitäten. Was bedeudet, dass selbst da eine enges Netzwerk herscht.

Zitat:

Original geschrieben von LexPacis

Ich würde ohne Bedenken einen Camry kaufen, der in USA hergestellt wurde - mal abgesehen von den typisch amerikanischen Blinklichtern, die ich bis heute nicht nachvollziehen kann und einfach nur nerven.

[OT] Hallo Oliver,

die Doppelfunktion der Blinker bei US-Autos ist noch ein Relikt aus den 60ern.

Damals (bis hinein in die 80er/frühen 90er) wurden bei den Amerikanern Sealed Beam-Scheinwerfer verbaut, welche ein Vakuum benutzen, in das ein Reflektor und eine Linse eingebaut sind. Somit war kein Platz mehr im Leuchtkörper, noch ein Standlicht einzubauen. Da aber ab 1968 eines vorgeschrieben war und keine weiteren Lampen außer dem Schinwerfer, dem Blinker und der Seitenmarkierungsleuchte verbaut werden durften, musste die Blinkleuchte fortan auch als Standlicht (Parking Lamps) herhalten - oft gleich in einer Einheit mit der SML. Seitdem werden 2-Faden-Glühbirnen verbaut, die 7W und 21W stark leuchten können. Somit kommt es zum gelben Dauerleuchten, welches beim Blinken pulsiert.

Diese gelben Lampen können auch als 21W Tagfahrlicht eingesetzt werden.

Mittlerweile ist eine Lampenanordnung wie in Europa oder Japan erlaubt, mit einer zusätzlichen weißen Glühbirne als Parking Lamp. Lediglich die Seitenmarkierungsleuchte muss noch separat in gelb erstrahlen. [/OT]

Gruß

Flo

Ähnliche Themen
  1. Startseite
  2. Forum
  3. Auto
  4. Toyota
  5. Toyota schlechter und schlechter